Is the technique for electric different from regular violin?


Yes and no. You still have fingerings and bowings, but electric is much less strict in terms of technical freedom. You can slide and put your finger slightly off to create the intended sound effect, while on regular violin these mishaps would be clearly audible to others, usually in a bad way.

I have limited time and don't have much time to practice. Can I still learn this instrument?
If you do not practice you will not be able to play the more advanced pieces you see in the videos. However, with minimal practice you will be surprised by the kind of sound you will be able to generate. After learning how to hold the bow and violin, you can probably learn simple songs like " ********," depending on how fast of a learner you are.

Do I need classical training to begin electric violin?
Not necessarily. While knowing the basics will allow you to learn much more quickly, you can still play simple phrases that sound relatively impressive for a beginner. If you already know the basics, then this program is perfect for you as you will be able to follow along the notes and better absorb the techniques, bowing patterns, and fingerings necessary to play the song.

If you are an absolute beginner it won't be as easy, but with dedication you'll be able to learn the easy songs like Enter Sandman. However, learning the more intermediate level songs like Cliffs of Dover (where clarity is important) would be more of a challenge. You might be best suited to buy a single lesson on Enter Sandman and see how well you do with that.

Isn't private instruction more effective?
Private lessons are not for everyone. For those of you who are currently taking lessons, you know what we are talking about. Most instructors teach classical only and will teach you endless scales and exercises. If you are lucky, you will learn very difficult concertos that are around 15 minutes long for --not exactly something you can perform easily and impress your friends with.
Private lessons cost around $40-$50/hour. One lesson per week and that's already at least $200 for one month and $2,400 for one year. Not to mention the time to go to an instructor's house and gas costs. Good luck finding an instructor that specializes in teaching you songs that you actually want to learn.

What is my motivation to learn? Who are my role models?

Is the technique for electric different from regular violin?
Yes and no. You still have fingerings and bowings, but electric is much less strict in terms of technical freedom. You can slide and put your finger slightly off to create the intended sound effect, while on regular violin these mishaps would be clearly audible to others, usually in a bad way.

I have limited time and don't have much time to practice. Can I still learn this instrument?
If you do not practice you will not be able to play the more advanced pieces you see in the videos. However, with minimal practice you will be surprised by the kind of sound you will be able to generate. After learning how to hold the bow and violin, you can probably learn simple songs like " ********," depending on how fast of a learner you are.

Do I need classical training to begin electric violin?
Not necessarily. While knowing the basics will allow you to learn much more quickly, you can still play simple phrases that sound relatively impressive for a beginner. If you already know the basics, then this program is perfect for you as you will be able to follow along the notes and better absorb the techniques, bowing patterns, and fingerings necessary to play the song.

If you are an absolute beginner it won't be as easy, but with dedication you'll be able to learn the easy songs like Enter Sandman. However, learning the more intermediate level songs like Cliffs of Dover (where clarity is important) would be more of a challenge. You might be best suited to buy a single lesson on Enter Sandman and see how well you do with that.

Isn't private instruction more effective?
Private lessons are not for everyone. For those of you who are currently taking lessons, you know what we are talking about. Most instructors teach classical only and will teach you endless scales and exercises. If you are lucky, you will learn very difficult concertos that are around 15 minutes long for --not exactly something you can perform easily and impress your friends with.
Private lessons cost around $40-$50/hour. One lesson per week and that's already at least $200 for one month and $2,400 for one year. Not to mention the time to go to an instructor's house and gas costs. Good luck finding an instructor that specializes in teaching you songs that you actually want to learn.

What is my motivation to learn? Who are my role models?

 

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